Tips for Protecting Your Teen Behind the Wheel

The moment your teen turns 16 is exciting, but is also potentially worrisome for parents. As they acquire their driver’s license, they’re well on their path to independence, however, protecting them is still your priority.

But how do you protect them, when you’re not around?

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Here are a few tips to ensure your teen is safe, when they get behind the wheel:

  • Be sure that the vehicle your teen is behind the wheel in is in tip-top shape. Verify the safety ratings on the vehicle, as well as the current condition of the tires, brakes, and engine. Contact our Service Department to ensure the vehicle that your teen will be driving is up-to-par.
  • It might be a good idea to limit the time that your teen is allowed to be behind the wheel; according to an article from esurance, most accidents involving teen drivers occur after 9:00 PM, so, setting curfews could be in their best interest.
  • Limit the number of passengers that your teen is allowed to travel with, to help avoid distractions.
  • Speak with your teen about the dangers of driving distracted, or driving under the influence.
  • Be sure to thoroughly teach your teen about all the features of the vehicle they will be driving, before they get behind the wheel. Ensure your teen knows exactly where to find the switches for the lights, windshield wipers, and hazard lights, in case of emergency.

Driving is an exciting privilege, but could potentially be a very dangerous task. To learn what vehicle might be the best fit for your teen, visit us at WaldorfFord.com, or contact us today!

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Safe Driving Tips for Teens

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Teen Driving Deaths on the Rise; Parents Can Help Reverse Trend

  • Parents play a key role in teens’ decisions on safe driving. Research for Ford’s Driving Skills for Life program (DSFL) shows teens tend to emulate how their parents drive.
  • Traffic fatalities are the leading cause of death for American teens. There were more than 3,000 teen fatalities in 2010, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).
  • In 2013, Ford Driving Skills for Life will reach about 200 high schools with its safe driving materials, thanks to Ford Motor Company Fund and the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA).

WALDORF, MARYLAND, 4/10/13 – Traffic fatalities are the leading cause of death for American teens. In recent weeks, a number of crashes involving teen drivers have led to more than a dozen teenagers tragically losing their lives. And a recent report by the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) shows that teen driver fatalities are on the rise among 16-17-year-old drivers.

“By setting a good example behind the wheel, parents can increase the chances their children will adopt safe driving practices,” said Greg Basiliko General Manager of Waldorf Ford.  “While state laws and educational programs are critical, ultimately, parents are the most critical component to keep their teen drivers safe.”

Parents can help reverse that trend. Research done for Ford’s Driving Skills for Life (DSFL) program shows teens tend to emulate how their parents drive. In fact, more than three quarters of teens and tweens surveyed say they rely heavily on their parents’ advice when they start to drive.

Tips for parents

Experts from Ford Driving Skills for Life have tips on what parents can do to help their teens be better drivers:

  • Engage in the driving process – As teens get closer to earning/acquiring their learner’s permit, parents should actively engage with them about driving. Talk about safe driving behaviors, practice with them, seek educational opportunities, and be clear that unsafe actions won’t be tolerated.
  • Buckle up – It’s the law, and if parents don’t wear their seat belts, their teen is more likely to do the same. In a crash, a person not buckled up is much more likely to be injured or killed than someone wearing a seat belt.
  • Never speed – Research done for Ford Driving Skills for Life shows that if parents speed, their teens are more likely to do the same. Excessive speed continues to be a factor in about one third of all traffic deaths nationally.
  • Don’t drive distracted – By setting a tough “no distractions” rule for their teens and modeling this same behavior, parents send the message that distracted driving will not be tolerated.
  • Don’t follow too closely – Parents should keep the proper distance from the car in front of them. Rear end collisions are common and preventable.
  • Always scan ahead for hazards– Parents should remind their teens to be aware of what is going on around them by scanning to the right and left as they drive
  • Limit the number of passengers – Research shows young drivers can easily be distracted by just one additional passenger – increasing the risk of a crash exponentially. Many graduated driver’s license programs restrict the number of passengers as a condition of issuing an early license or permit; parents should enforce those restrictions.
  • Never drink and drive – Parents should remind teens that drinking and driving will not be tolerated.

 

Ford Driving Skills for Life

In addition to hands-on clinics, Ford Driving Skills for Life will reach an additional 150 high schools with its safe driving materials, Web-based learning, partnerships with state highway safety agencies, fun contests and free educational materials for parents and teachers.

You can find more information online at DrivingSkillsForLife.com.

Visit Waldorf Ford at 2440 Crain Hwy, Waldorf, MD 20601 or call 888-284-1463.